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[hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Felicitus
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Hi,

our hackerspace [1] has been hit by WiFi problems (clients can't
sometimes associate to the AP, seems to be related to the amount of
clients we've got) on the OpenWRT platform, and it seems that we're
not the only ones.

I'v heard from at least from one hackerspace who dumped their consumer
router in favor of an enterprise solution.

I'm interested in which WiFi hardware you run (especially if you need
to serve 30+ devices on a regular basis) and what problems you've
encountered.

Thanks,
Felicitus

[1] http://www.raumzeitlabor.de
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Volatile Compound
Cisco Aironet 1100 + pfSense.  No problems whatsoever in covering a
2000-sq. ft. retail/industrial area.

I should, however, point out that ours was installed by a Haitian witch
doctor well-versed in the voodoo sciences, so that may have had
something to do with its near-infalliable reliability.  It has been
known to come to life and roam the countryside demanding feasts of human
brains, however.

- skroo.

On 10/20/12 3:57 PM, Felicitus wrote:

> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> Hi,
>
> our hackerspace [1] has been hit by WiFi problems (clients can't
> sometimes associate to the AP, seems to be related to the amount of
> clients we've got) on the OpenWRT platform, and it seems that we're
> not the only ones.
>
> I'v heard from at least from one hackerspace who dumped their consumer
> router in favor of an enterprise solution.
>
> I'm interested in which WiFi hardware you run (especially if you need
> to serve 30+ devices on a regular basis) and what problems you've
> encountered.
>
> Thanks,
> Felicitus
>
> [1] http://www.raumzeitlabor.de
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
> Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
> Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/
>
> iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJQgyxCAAoJEJYpjrA42x19jh8H/2qmOJwsMooK3unZtB0Fofjw
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> 7WRCPMvuVGFh2WeYTCgF6siIEbdEU54vX/Wf+l+rLaSbGJZHeSGhsfFN3MNpfxn2
> jwJyB8MAFIf23DwTe49O6RyAxoawnEk4Q1XfYaGbYCuG2wO3/Z4hcCu1dkvmd6XB
> oBl5MVL9V+pVjyH8rtYS5aIwA3IQmug88VTuOpXPyqHyJGK5Jo/OnawbSlxyz8ik
> flWonY7qGuq9MToI0HE0gbVa2vrPa2aShZjTYb+QTQFwnkIcpxgqTv6UVMT0qfs=
> =1kBp
> -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
> _______________________________________________
> Discuss mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.hackerspaces.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss

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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Chris Weiss
if you read the spec sheets, it's generally documented on consumer
grade AP/routers that they support 20-25 clients max.  Cisco, buffalo,
ubiquity, routerboard are but a few that have AP's that support more.
trick is in reading the specs before you buy.
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Blackhold
In reply to this post by Felicitus
have you test unifi?

at my home for the main router I use an RB750GL and 2 unifi AP.

once on a hackmeeting I mounted 5 RB750GL, one was the master, an then
4 communicates with that using BGP routing. Then each port had 1 DHCP
autoritative, so then I could offer connectivity to 253*4*4, 4048
users, simply what I had to do is put AP in cascade. With this could
have 16 different networks with communication with all.

http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/configurando-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011-meighacks/
http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/nodo-hackmeeting-como-esta-montada-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011/

for the internet connection I putted a transparent proxy caching all
the connections, in some cases, with a network with a lot of users I
found that ADSL default router died caused to the big amount of
connections, with a proxy in the middle router continued working :)
you have to take care, that the ADSL routers that put our ISP are a
fucking shit router, sometimes, the best way is to change it and put
some good stuff, as I told, at my home (I have fiber optics), I use a
mikrotik RB750GL, but if you want a good router to could manage lot of
users, I recommend you mikrotik RB450GL, or mikrotik RB1000 Series :)

I wish it could be useful!


- Blackhold

2012/10/21 Felicitus <[hidden email]>:

> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> Hi,
>
> our hackerspace [1] has been hit by WiFi problems (clients can't
> sometimes associate to the AP, seems to be related to the amount of
> clients we've got) on the OpenWRT platform, and it seems that we're
> not the only ones.
>
> I'v heard from at least from one hackerspace who dumped their consumer
> router in favor of an enterprise solution.
>
> I'm interested in which WiFi hardware you run (especially if you need
> to serve 30+ devices on a regular basis) and what problems you've
> encountered.
>
> Thanks,
> Felicitus
>
> [1] http://www.raumzeitlabor.de
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
> Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
> Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/
>
> iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJQgyxCAAoJEJYpjrA42x19jh8H/2qmOJwsMooK3unZtB0Fofjw
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> flWonY7qGuq9MToI0HE0gbVa2vrPa2aShZjTYb+QTQFwnkIcpxgqTv6UVMT0qfs=
> =1kBp
> -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
> _______________________________________________
> Discuss mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.hackerspaces.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Arclight
I would second the recommendation of the Mikrotik routerboard
products. They are really the best "bang for buck" option if you'd
like an affordable hardware router with professional-grade features.
We use one as the router firewall for multiple sites, as well as
access point.

Various models have 1Gb/s Ethernet, 1W radios, programmable on-board
switch, PoE, etc.

If you need a wireless back-haul to another location, take a look at
Ubiquity Networks. Their products are simple and they just work. Buy
in pairs.

They also have a new line of self-bridging access points products out,
designed for indoor/outdoor mesh networks. Check out:

http://www.ubnt.com/unifi


Arclight

On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 1:37 AM, Blackhold <[hidden email]> wrote:

> have you test unifi?
>
> at my home for the main router I use an RB750GL and 2 unifi AP.
>
> once on a hackmeeting I mounted 5 RB750GL, one was the master, an then
> 4 communicates with that using BGP routing. Then each port had 1 DHCP
> autoritative, so then I could offer connectivity to 253*4*4, 4048
> users, simply what I had to do is put AP in cascade. With this could
> have 16 different networks with communication with all.
>
> http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/configurando-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011-meighacks/
> http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/nodo-hackmeeting-como-esta-montada-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011/
>
> for the internet connection I putted a transparent proxy caching all
> the connections, in some cases, with a network with a lot of users I
> found that ADSL default router died caused to the big amount of
> connections, with a proxy in the middle router continued working :)
> you have to take care, that the ADSL routers that put our ISP are a
> fucking shit router, sometimes, the best way is to change it and put
> some good stuff, as I told, at my home (I have fiber optics), I use a
> mikrotik RB750GL, but if you want a good router to could manage lot of
> users, I recommend you mikrotik RB450GL, or mikrotik RB1000 Series :)
>
> I wish it could be useful!
>
>
> - Blackhold
>
> 2012/10/21 Felicitus <[hidden email]>:
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> our hackerspace [1] has been hit by WiFi problems (clients can't
>> sometimes associate to the AP, seems to be related to the amount of
>> clients we've got) on the OpenWRT platform, and it seems that we're
>> not the only ones.
>>
>> I'v heard from at least from one hackerspace who dumped their consumer
>> router in favor of an enterprise solution.
>>
>> I'm interested in which WiFi hardware you run (especially if you need
>> to serve 30+ devices on a regular basis) and what problems you've
>> encountered.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Felicitus
>>
>> [1] http://www.raumzeitlabor.de
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
>> Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
>> Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/
>>
>> iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJQgyxCAAoJEJYpjrA42x19jh8H/2qmOJwsMooK3unZtB0Fofjw
>> Ex/ife/9LXD+3PMjsLuV0tZzEVUcmfpxbJaLERAJi4X2ugmL288qNaB+PFVtJWM/
>> 7WRCPMvuVGFh2WeYTCgF6siIEbdEU54vX/Wf+l+rLaSbGJZHeSGhsfFN3MNpfxn2
>> jwJyB8MAFIf23DwTe49O6RyAxoawnEk4Q1XfYaGbYCuG2wO3/Z4hcCu1dkvmd6XB
>> oBl5MVL9V+pVjyH8rtYS5aIwA3IQmug88VTuOpXPyqHyJGK5Jo/OnawbSlxyz8ik
>> flWonY7qGuq9MToI0HE0gbVa2vrPa2aShZjTYb+QTQFwnkIcpxgqTv6UVMT0qfs=
>> =1kBp
>> -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
>> _______________________________________________
>> Discuss mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://lists.hackerspaces.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss
> _______________________________________________
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Felicitus
In reply to this post by Chris Weiss
> if you read the spec sheets, it's generally documented on consumer
> grade AP/routers that they support 20-25 clients max.

Usually vendors in the SoHo sector don't give an indication on how many
clients are supported. In our particular case, the WNDR3800, doesn't
have any number in their spec sheet [1].

It seems that there's some kind of bug in the ath9k chipset, as the 5GHz
band runs without problems.

> Cisco, buffalo,
> ubiquity, routerboard are but a few that have AP's that support more.
> trick is in reading the specs before you buy.

We have given the hint to look into the ubiquity unifi series. However,
the mixed 2.4GHz/5GHz model is too expensive for us, so if I can
convince our members, we most likely go for the unifi 2.4GHz model.

We aren't a premium hackerspace in terms of membership fees, thus we
can't buy hardware like companies do.

Also, specs are one thing, but experiences are another.

Regards
Felicitus




[1] http://www.netgear.com/images/WNDR3800_DS_04Oct1118-17620.pdf

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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Russ Garrett
On 21 October 2012 23:51, Felicitus <[hidden email]> wrote:
> We have given the hint to look into the ubiquity unifi series. However,
> the mixed 2.4GHz/5GHz model is too expensive for us, so if I can
> convince our members, we most likely go for the unifi 2.4GHz model.

We have one of the 2.4GHz Ubiquiti UniFi APs at London Hackspace and
it works fine - I would completely recommend it. Their management
software is great, and runs on Linux (even if it is non-Free).

I have the dual-band UniFi Pro at home and it's excellent if you can afford it.

--
Russ Garrett
[hidden email]
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Felicitus
In reply to this post by Felicitus
> try updating to a more recent openwrt build.

We're running attitude adjustment r33838.

> /etc/init.d/network reload

No, that doesn't help. We need to reboot the router.

> ps: we are using a bunch of openwrt devices for wifi at raumfahrtagentur.org

Do these devices do use the ath9k driver? That's the one I believe has a
bug.

regards
Felicitus
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Andrew LeCody
In reply to this post by Arclight
I also like MikroTik/Rounterboard, but I feel compelled to point out that they use injected/passive PoE, not the 802.3 stuff.

On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 1:45 PM, Arclight <[hidden email]> wrote:
I would second the recommendation of the Mikrotik routerboard
products. They are really the best "bang for buck" option if you'd
like an affordable hardware router with professional-grade features.
We use one as the router firewall for multiple sites, as well as
access point.

Various models have 1Gb/s Ethernet, 1W radios, programmable on-board
switch, PoE, etc.

If you need a wireless back-haul to another location, take a look at
Ubiquity Networks. Their products are simple and they just work. Buy
in pairs.

They also have a new line of self-bridging access points products out,
designed for indoor/outdoor mesh networks. Check out:

http://www.ubnt.com/unifi


Arclight

On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 1:37 AM, Blackhold <[hidden email]> wrote:
> have you test unifi?
>
> at my home for the main router I use an RB750GL and 2 unifi AP.
>
> once on a hackmeeting I mounted 5 RB750GL, one was the master, an then
> 4 communicates with that using BGP routing. Then each port had 1 DHCP
> autoritative, so then I could offer connectivity to 253*4*4, 4048
> users, simply what I had to do is put AP in cascade. With this could
> have 16 different networks with communication with all.
>
> http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/configurando-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011-meighacks/
> http://blackhold.nusepas.com/2011/10/nodo-hackmeeting-como-esta-montada-la-red-del-hackmeeting-2011/
>
> for the internet connection I putted a transparent proxy caching all
> the connections, in some cases, with a network with a lot of users I
> found that ADSL default router died caused to the big amount of
> connections, with a proxy in the middle router continued working :)
> you have to take care, that the ADSL routers that put our ISP are a
> fucking shit router, sometimes, the best way is to change it and put
> some good stuff, as I told, at my home (I have fiber optics), I use a
> mikrotik RB750GL, but if you want a good router to could manage lot of
> users, I recommend you mikrotik RB450GL, or mikrotik RB1000 Series :)
>
> I wish it could be useful!
>
>
> - Blackhold
>
> 2012/10/21 Felicitus <[hidden email]>:
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> our hackerspace [1] has been hit by WiFi problems (clients can't
>> sometimes associate to the AP, seems to be related to the amount of
>> clients we've got) on the OpenWRT platform, and it seems that we're
>> not the only ones.
>>
>> I'v heard from at least from one hackerspace who dumped their consumer
>> router in favor of an enterprise solution.
>>
>> I'm interested in which WiFi hardware you run (especially if you need
>> to serve 30+ devices on a regular basis) and what problems you've
>> encountered.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Felicitus
>>
>> [1] http://www.raumzeitlabor.de
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
>> Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
>> Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/
>>
>> iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJQgyxCAAoJEJYpjrA42x19jh8H/2qmOJwsMooK3unZtB0Fofjw
>> Ex/ife/9LXD+3PMjsLuV0tZzEVUcmfpxbJaLERAJi4X2ugmL288qNaB+PFVtJWM/
>> 7WRCPMvuVGFh2WeYTCgF6siIEbdEU54vX/Wf+l+rLaSbGJZHeSGhsfFN3MNpfxn2
>> jwJyB8MAFIf23DwTe49O6RyAxoawnEk4Q1XfYaGbYCuG2wO3/Z4hcCu1dkvmd6XB
>> oBl5MVL9V+pVjyH8rtYS5aIwA3IQmug88VTuOpXPyqHyJGK5Jo/OnawbSlxyz8ik
>> flWonY7qGuq9MToI0HE0gbVa2vrPa2aShZjTYb+QTQFwnkIcpxgqTv6UVMT0qfs=
>> =1kBp
>> -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
>> _______________________________________________
>> Discuss mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://lists.hackerspaces.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss
> _______________________________________________
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Rubin Abdi
In reply to this post by Felicitus
If over the air security isn't a concern (and I really hope it isn't), I
would highly recommend acquiring some sort of enterprise level 802.11a
access point. Why use something so dated? First off they're cheap to get
if you browse ebay for a few days. Secondly 802.11a runs in the 5gHz
range, which is way less polluted than the more known 2.4gHz range that
802.11bg run off of.

I have yet to enter a hack space where about 50% of the laptops in use
at any given time are a mix of MacBooks and ThinkPads. All MacBooks and
most ThinkPads ship with wifi cards that can hop onto 5gHz wifi. I've
been able to max out 802.11a at somewhere between 0.5 - 1 mbyt/s, which
in all honesty is more than enough for everyday hacker space usage.

Basically if you can get half off the devices generating noise off of
the 2.4 gHz range, you help both groups to some extent. Generally at
Noisebridge when people state the fairly unhelpful words of "The
internet is down", I run a quick mtr while on our 802.11a network, see
that I have no problems. I ask the person if they're on wifi and if so
which network, pretty much every time it's our 2.4gHz network. At that
point I let them know I'm not having problems, and ask them to either
swap out to eithernet or see if their laptop can hit the 5gHz network,
either of which tends to fix their problems.

All that being said, if you've got that cash, go for 802.11n running at
5gHz. You can run it at 2.4gHz but there's really no point as the access
point you'll be using most likely will also offer 802.11g at the same
frequency, and the moment someone hits the access point with a machine
that doesn't support 802.11n, everyone will be dropped down to g.

At Noisebridge we run a pair of Cisco 1100 for our 802.11bg/2.4gHz
network, and a Ubiquiti PowerStation 5 running 802.11a/5gHz. The Ciscos
are problematic and really need to be replaced, and we've never had any
problems with the PowerStation.

Ubiquiti gear is rock solid, and pending funds, we'll eventually get
some UniFi Pro devices, which have radios to run 2.4 and 5 ghz at the
same time. A set of 3 is about $600 - $700 on ebay.

If we were strapping for cash (which we typically are), and I had time
to actually work on this shit, I would use several NanoStation Locos in
the space.

--
Rubin
[hidden email]


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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Jonathan Lassoff
On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 1:20 PM, Rubin Abdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
> All that being said, if you've got that cash, go for 802.11n running at
> 5gHz. You can run it at 2.4gHz but there's really no point as the access
> point you'll be using most likely will also offer 802.11g at the same
> frequency, and the moment someone hits the access point with a machine
> that doesn't support 802.11n, everyone will be dropped down to g.

The best way to keep the better client adapters (supporting 5 Ghz and
802.11n HT) from being dragged down by older, more inefficient radios
is to segment ESSIDs. It's certainly possible to run the same ESSID
("network name") with multiple access points, but as Rubin points out,
it just takes one slow adapter to sully the bunch.

This is why we run our 5 Ghz AP as "noisebridge-a", and our 802.11b/g
stuff as "noisebridge".

> At Noisebridge we run a pair of Cisco 1100 for our 802.11bg/2.4gHz
> network, and a Ubiquiti PowerStation 5 running 802.11a/5gHz. The Ciscos
> are problematic and really need to be replaced, and we've never had any
> problems with the PowerStation.

Actually, I think that the Cisco radios have been rock solid, but the
2.4 Ghz ISM spectrum not so much. If we had a lot more Ethernet and
2.4 Ghz APs sprayed all over the place, I don't think it would be as
big of an issue.

> Ubiquiti gear is rock solid, and pending funds, we'll eventually get
> some UniFi Pro devices, which have radios to run 2.4 and 5 ghz at the
> same time. A set of 3 is about $600 - $700 on ebay.
>
> If we were strapping for cash (which we typically are), and I had time
> to actually work on this shit, I would use several NanoStation Locos in
> the space.

Here, here! Ubiquiti makes some great gear, and nearly all of it runs
OpenWRT swimmingly if you're into firmware hacks.
The Ubiquiti "AirOS" firmware seems much more geared towards WISPs,
and less towards 802.11 access.

Cheers,
jof
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Matt Joyce
Just chiming in.

I've also heard about openwrt scaling issues.

I know at nycresistor we had failures under large numbers of folks
operating with the fonera2.0n units.  Work solid at home... but
scaling... nopers.

I have a buffalo unit with atheros i do dev work on.  I suppose I
could try to do some stress testing on it.

buffalo wzr-ag-300h unit.

On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 1:54 PM, Jonathan Lassoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 1:20 PM, Rubin Abdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> All that being said, if you've got that cash, go for 802.11n running at
>> 5gHz. You can run it at 2.4gHz but there's really no point as the access
>> point you'll be using most likely will also offer 802.11g at the same
>> frequency, and the moment someone hits the access point with a machine
>> that doesn't support 802.11n, everyone will be dropped down to g.
>
> The best way to keep the better client adapters (supporting 5 Ghz and
> 802.11n HT) from being dragged down by older, more inefficient radios
> is to segment ESSIDs. It's certainly possible to run the same ESSID
> ("network name") with multiple access points, but as Rubin points out,
> it just takes one slow adapter to sully the bunch.
>
> This is why we run our 5 Ghz AP as "noisebridge-a", and our 802.11b/g
> stuff as "noisebridge".
>
>> At Noisebridge we run a pair of Cisco 1100 for our 802.11bg/2.4gHz
>> network, and a Ubiquiti PowerStation 5 running 802.11a/5gHz. The Ciscos
>> are problematic and really need to be replaced, and we've never had any
>> problems with the PowerStation.
>
> Actually, I think that the Cisco radios have been rock solid, but the
> 2.4 Ghz ISM spectrum not so much. If we had a lot more Ethernet and
> 2.4 Ghz APs sprayed all over the place, I don't think it would be as
> big of an issue.
>
>> Ubiquiti gear is rock solid, and pending funds, we'll eventually get
>> some UniFi Pro devices, which have radios to run 2.4 and 5 ghz at the
>> same time. A set of 3 is about $600 - $700 on ebay.
>>
>> If we were strapping for cash (which we typically are), and I had time
>> to actually work on this shit, I would use several NanoStation Locos in
>> the space.
>
> Here, here! Ubiquiti makes some great gear, and nearly all of it runs
> OpenWRT swimmingly if you're into firmware hacks.
> The Ubiquiti "AirOS" firmware seems much more geared towards WISPs,
> and less towards 802.11 access.
>
> Cheers,
> jof
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Jonathan Lassoff
On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 1:59 PM, Matt Joyce <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Just chiming in.
>
> I've also heard about openwrt scaling issues.
>
> I know at nycresistor we had failures under large numbers of folks
> operating with the fonera2.0n units.  Work solid at home... but
> scaling... nopers.

Any idea what issues you or others were seeing? What was the bottleneck?

I'm curious, as I'm currently working on an OpenWRT-based access
network and haven't had any issues in the architecture.

Was it an issue with OpenWRT, or perhaps an 802.11 scaling limitation?
Maybe a manifestation of the hidden node problem?

The advantage to some of the more "enterprise"-ey systems is that they
can coordinate the configuration of many APs (either from a central
box, or in a distributed fashion), tuning radios to other frequencies
and deassciating clients as they get closer to other APs.

Cheers,
jof
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Re: [hackerspaces] What's your WiFi setup?

Matt Joyce
Never could tell.  Just heard repeated complaints from folks.  Most of
them just unplugged / replugged or swapped to failover... so no triage
ever could be done, and there was no way to reproduce the problem.

=/

switched to another router and complaints went away.

On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 2:05 PM, Jonathan Lassoff <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 1:59 PM, Matt Joyce <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Just chiming in.
>>
>> I've also heard about openwrt scaling issues.
>>
>> I know at nycresistor we had failures under large numbers of folks
>> operating with the fonera2.0n units.  Work solid at home... but
>> scaling... nopers.
>
> Any idea what issues you or others were seeing? What was the bottleneck?
>
> I'm curious, as I'm currently working on an OpenWRT-based access
> network and haven't had any issues in the architecture.
>
> Was it an issue with OpenWRT, or perhaps an 802.11 scaling limitation?
> Maybe a manifestation of the hidden node problem?
>
> The advantage to some of the more "enterprise"-ey systems is that they
> can coordinate the configuration of many APs (either from a central
> box, or in a distributed fashion), tuning radios to other frequencies
> and deassciating clients as they get closer to other APs.
>
> Cheers,
> jof
> _______________________________________________
> Discuss mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.hackerspaces.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss
_______________________________________________
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